Monday, April 11, 2011

Inquiring Minds Gotta Know

Author email newsletters.  Do you read them? Do you care to read them?  If you read them, what kinds of information do you like to see?

I'm pondering whether to move forward with creating regularly emailed newsletters about upcoming book news, giveaways, events, etc. but, before I did, I wanted to check with the really smart people out there.  That means You, by the way.

Personally, I am on dozens of email lists for publishers and authors.  While I usually read a couple from publishers, admittedly I do not always read newsletters, even from some of my fave authors.  Not because I don't want to but because there are only so many hours in a day.

So, what do you think, mes amies? Are author newsletters emailed to an inbox near you a good thing or a waste of an author's (and your) valuable time?  Do you prefer to get your information from blogs and web sites instead?  If you do like newsletters, what kind of information interests you? 

19 comments:

Colette said...

I think a newsletter is only useful if it offers something that isn't available elsewhere. Is there enough to say to create one? That's the key question!

Talei said...

I have say, anything via email gets glossed over pretty quickly these days, especially with my Inbox. It's so cluttered that I only sift through the VIP matters first. I'm not sure I'd need another one to add to it. (IMHO) Hope that helps. I find twitter and the author websites easier to track info etc. ;-)

Have a fab week!

Donna Cummings said...

Liz, I've been pondering this issue too, so I'd love to hear what everyone thinks. Personally I feel I can find out what I need to know from Twitter and author websites/blogs. Plus if there's a new release the author visits a lot of other blogs, so that keeps me updated too. :)

JB Lynn said...

I sign up for author newsletters with the best of intentions, but I find that I rarely open them once they arrive because I'm always rushing to get thru the "important" stuff....whatever that might be.

Angelina Rain said...

Remember that not all readers like to follow the author through blogger/facebook/twitter so a newsletter would be a perfect way to reach them. But those kind of readers who don’t follow you through social media are less likely to be interested in your personal life so keep your newsletters professional, short, and fill it with information about an upcoming book. I think readers will enjoy that. Also, find a way to make the newsletter free (for you and the reader) so just in case they fail to bring you higher sales, you’re not wasting money on it.

I feel like anything that is likely to sell a book is worth trying.

Shirley Wells said...

I have mixed views on this. And I'm gearing up to send out my latest newsletter - the first of the year.

Lots of authors' newsletters drop into my Inbox and I do look at them all. I'm not sure if that's just because I'm an author and want to know how other authors are faring or not. I like them to be brief and to the point. A plus point, from the author's point of view, is that the book covers stick in my mind - and that has to be a good thing.

LOL, I'm not being very helpful, am I? I shall watch these comments with interest!

Linda Leszczuk said...

I have to to admit, if I'm following someone's blog (as I do yours), I figure I'm as up to date as I need to be. Just not enough time to read newletters, too. But that's just me.

Michael Di Gesu said...

I have to agree with the masses. I prefer visiting blogs for information. Everything is usually there.

Elena Solodow said...

I think your blog is a better way to go.

Sierra Gardner said...

I don't get any author newsletters but if I did, I honestly probably wouldn't read them. There is only so much time.

Liz Fichera said...

It has been so interesting to read your comments and perspectives today. I'm wondering if newsletters have become the "MySpace" of communication? But, to Angelina's point, not everyone follows a person's social media. I think the key to making it attractive would be to offer something through the newsletter that's not offered anywhere else and, I'm wondering, if that's such a smart idea. It's kind of like asking a person to remember six phone numbers when all they really want is one (with everything).

It'll be interesting to see what comments come in to the blog tonight and tomorrow.

I remain unconvinced that newsletters are essential anymore.

Jeffrey Beesler said...

If newsletters are the only way for me to read about what's going on with an author, then so be it, I'll read it. But I'd rather read up on their current goings-on via a blog. Newsletters can fall prey to spam filters. Pleasure meeting you via the A-Z Challenge!

Giggle, Laugh, Cry said...

Just stopping by as a fellow A to Z Challenge taker!
gigglelaughcry.blogspot.com

DEZMOND said...

well, if people voluntary sign up for your newsletter it's OK, but there are some bloggers who send newsletters to all of their followers, which can be weird, since sometimes you don't read blogs of all of the people you officially follow and getting their e-mails can be weird :)

Stasia said...

Blog/Twitter/Facebook are probably my go-to's these days. That said, I don't mind getting the very occasional newsletter from an author doing something special (e.g., a tour in my area). I think direct-email should be brief and well-targeted with teaser in the re line or I likely won't get to reading it for ages. I do receive newsletters from a few authors--mostly picture-book or educationally oriented folks.

Summer Ross said...

I read some things- but mostly I don't have enough time to read through very many- time seems more like a block than anything

Liz Fichera said...

Thanks for all the comments! Much to ponder here...

Áine Tierney said...

I have one I read, it comes into my account every couple of months. It's often enough, as I have more regular links that I don't read as they are always piling up and as there are so many of them they don't seem that special.

Twimom227 said...

I enjoy author newsletters that are infrequent and contain critical information - like when a new release is coming out, if the author is touring, contests, etc. It filters out the "important" information and delivers it directly to my mailbox.