Friday, April 1, 2011

Apache Kid

Throughout April, I'm participating in the A-Z Blogfest where writers are encouraged to blog the alphabet. So today, for example, you blog about anything that starts with A.  While I can't promise I'll blog every letter (I typically like to blog Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays), I'll certainly do my best.

I couldn't pass up "A" though, especially since the main character in my current work-in-progress is none other than the very mysterious Apache Kid.

The legend of the Apache Kid fascinates me probably because there is so much about him we don't know.  And even the stuff we think we know about him is sketchy. 

He was born a White Mountain Apache around 1860.  I've seen several accounts of his real name, including this one:  Haskay-Bay-Nay-Ntayl.  He was abandoned when he has a child and raised by a U.S. Military Scout named Al Sieber in Globe, Arizona.  No one could pronounce his Apache name, so the cowboys, miners and military people in Globe started calling him The Apache Kid or, simply, The Kid.  Al Sieber was also the guy who trained him to be a scout.  He became very successful at scouting and was later promoted to the First Sergeant of Agency Scouts.  However, as you can imagine, being a scout for the U.S. Military did not exactly make him very popular among the Apache because a large part of that job was tracking down rebel Apaches like Geronimo.

One day, his real father was killed and the Apache Kid returned to the San Carlos reservation to defend his father's honor by killing the person who killed his father.  (And here's where the history gets even fuzzier.)  This led to court trials, prison time, gun battles and escapes.  A who-done-it masterpiece.  Historians have been unable to agree on his crimes nor even when and where he died, which makes him all the more intriguing to me.  His Apache name means "tall man destined to come to a mysterious end" which pretty much summed up the Apache Kid.

17 comments:

Trisha said...

This is the kind of story we Aussies never hear about ;) Or I didn't in my schooling, anyway. But that's what's so great about this blogging community - the things I never would have learned if I wasn't part of it! :)

Francine Howarth said...

Hi,

Great little piece of true history!

Oooh, the challenge: beats ludo!

best
F

Áine Tierney said...

What a great character for your WIP! Love these sort of historical stories. Best of luck with the challenge. I've signed up too - though it will be later before I get to put up a post. I'm hoping that by the end of the month, even if I have missed some letters, I'll have a better blogging routine. Best.

Linda Leszczuk said...

I'll be looking forward to this one when it comes out. Keep working!

Shelley Batt said...

Very interesting. What a great post. I love to read about people, places and things that aren't real well known.

Heather M. Gardner said...

So interesting. How he lived with that daily struggle, two worlds and not being a real part of either one. Never trusted fully by either one.
Sounds like you picked a great mystery.
HMG

Margo Kelly said...

Very cool! I love your blog! I've given you an award!! You can pick it up from my blog: http://www.margokelly.blogspot.com

Donna Cummings said...

What an intriguing story! I can't wait to see how you flesh out this mystery -- it sounds like it's got so many great possibilities.

Colette said...

Liz, I love your choice of an 'A' topic.

Murees Dupé said...

Great post! I love reading about the history of other countries.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I've heard of The Kid but I never knew the story. Interesting post.

J.L. Campbell said...

He sounds fascinating. I'll bet you have lots of exciting plot points in that novel.

Angelina Rain said...

Thanks for the history lesson. I love learning about different cultures, especially Native Americans.

Nas Dean said...

I love to read about people, places and things that aren't real well known.

Thanks for this lesson in history!

Adina West said...

What a fascinating story...and showing yet again the uneasy alliance between the interests of traditional inhabitants and white settlers. Plenty of conflict here for fiction!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Liz .. interesting to read your notes on the Apache Kid .. as Trisha says .. it's a great way to learn.

Hope you're enjoying your books this weekend .. as I've snuck in backwards! Read your other posts and landed here to comment .. cheers Hilary

Deirdra Eden-Coppel said...

I'm giving out awards for the A-Z challenge participants and as I browsed your blog I want to award you the Creative Blog Award.
Go to http://astorybookworld.blogspot.com/p/awards.html and pick up your award.
~Deirdra